Category: Edibles

Just say, ‘Si’ to THC Tacos

Oct. 4 is National Taco Day. Here’s how to celebrate tacos with cannabis every day.

ED MURRIETA

Tacos stretch budgets and feed villages.

With a little meat, some vegetables, a few tortillas, we eat.

With a little cannabis spicing each bite, we eat better, feeding our bellies and heads.

As popular street food throughout Mexico, tacos are filled with anything from beef to chicken to mushrooms to potatoes to tongue to goat.

Everything is a taco,.

Tacos are for everyone.

As National Taco Day approaches Oct. 4, tacos are seemingly everywhere, from trusty trucks to high-end restaurants. Cannabis, it seems. is everywhere too.

Here are six ways to infuse street-food classic tacos with totally legal THC — in meat and veggies, in tortillas and cheese and in toppings and condiments, micro-dosing each bite.

You can always wash down infused tacos with cannabis beer or similar beverage for extra kick and cool crispness.

Eat too many infused tacos and you’ll take a THC siesta.

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Fall into Seasonal Fruit Highs

Cannabis makes fall fruit more fabulous and autumn colors more awesome.

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BY ED MURRIETA

Read my latest for Leafly here and try my killer candied quince.

Hungry for Hemp

Originally published in the Tacoma News Tribune, Jan. 12, 2005

downloadBY ED MURRIETA

When the pipe dreams of food entrepreneurs, hemp activists and libertarian farmers come true, America’s fruited plains will be ripe with emerald waves of industrial hemp, a plant deeply rooted in the nation’s fabric and politics.

In this imagined world, we’ll eat a perfectly balanced, scientifically documented source of the essential fatty acids we need to keep our arteries supple and our brains finely tuned, in consumer foods from hemp tofu to hemp ice cream. Never mind debunked claims of positive drug tests.

Hemp will rotate with corn and soybean crops, boosting domestic farming, processing and manufacturing as the United States joins industrialized economies from Germany to China in hemp cultivation.

Before American consumers get a mainstream hit of hemp, however, some hemp activists insist the ultimate shift in consciousness must occur: The United States government must end its prohibition against marijuana, hemp’s heady cousin.

These entangled political, market and consumer issues have bummed hemp’s high hopes of becoming the greatest thing since soy.

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Favorite Cooking Strain? Chef Coreen Carroll Loves Red Congolese’s Party Perk

‘It’s a really light and delicious and uplifting flower’

What’s your favorite cannabis strain for edibles?

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BY ED MURRIETA

What’s your favorite cannabis strain to cook or bake with? For her first cannabis cookbook, San Francisco cannabis chef Corren Carroll used Sour Diesel, a popular sativa-dominant strain that’s widely available wherever cannabis is grown and sold.

But her favorite strain, especially for edibles that’ll be consumed in lively social situations, is Red Congolese, a landrace strain of Mexican, African and Afghani roots whose hallmark effects are weightless euphoria and mental clarity.

“I’m a big fan of Red Congolese,” Carroll said. “It’s hands-down my favorite. It’s a really light and delicious and uplifting flower.”

It’s the ideal party strain.

“With party edibles, I’m a proponent of using uplifting flowers like sativa strains because it is a party and you don’t want people to be couch-locked,” Carroll said. “If it’s edibles for your home use or medicinal uses, then the indicas are better.”

Those cannabis marshmallows on the cover of “Edibles: Small Bites for the Modern Cannabis Kitchen,” co-authored with Stephanie Hua, a San Francisco food blogger and marshmallow edibles company Mellow? They’re made with Sour Diesel for the photo shoot but normally made with Red Congolese for retail sale.

“It’s something Stephanie uses in Mellow marshmallow edibles, a recipe we feature in the book,” Carroll said. 

Loaded with recipes foodies will dig with or without cannabis — roasted red beet hummus, duck meatball sliders, roasted grape crostini with cashew cream and pear-ginger float, all dosed at 5 mg per serving — “Edibles: Small Bites for the Modern Cannabis Kitchen” (Chronicle Books, $19.95) drops in November.  Read my report on “Edibles” and my interview with Coreen Carroll next month in the San Francisco Chronicle.

What’s your favorite cannabis strain to cook or bake with?

Red Congolese, a sativa.

The First Cannabis Supper: Holy Iron Chef with Pot!

5 Infused Ingredients.
5-Course Menu.
What Will Ed Cook?

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BY ED MURRIETA

Here’s the gimmick: I’ve got five cannabis ingredients and a five-course supper menu.

INGREDIENTS

  • Fresh Cannabis Flower
  • Kin Slips
  • Sprig THC soda
  • Defonce chocolate bar
  • Kiva Petra Mints

MENU

  • Sopa de Mota
  • Ensalada con Salsa Yesca
  • Ganja Granita
  • Chocolate Mole Wellington
  • Pot de Creme Brulee

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The Best Ice Cream I Ever Made Is Illegal

Start with raw milk and add cannabis if you wish.

Raw milk I purchased in 2008.

Raw milk I purchased in 2008.

BY ED MURRIETA

If you’ve got any health hangups about drinking raw unpasteurized dairy products, raw milk isn’t for you.

If you have no qualms, then raw milk is for you.

Raw milk tastes like fresh grass. It’s creamy yellow in shade, and thick and creamy to the mouth. Stays fresh in the fridge for two weeks.

Raw milk is great for drinking, making cheese, yogurt, creme fraiche or ice cream.

I don’t want to mess with raw milk’s flavor by infusing the dairy with cannabis. Cannabis chocolate can be folded into spun ice cream for a special spin.

Raw milk is illegal in most places. Good luck finding it.

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Public Service Post: Consume Responsibly

Ed’s note: This is a prototype of Public Service Content on a California cannabis politics blog  I produced in 2015.

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Public Service Post: Consume Responsibly

Ed’s note: This is a prototype of Public Service Content on a California cannabis politics blog  I produced in 2015.

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Cannabis Intoxicates Brewers

Craft beers infused with CBD and THC and natural aromas and flavors engineered to mimic cannabis terpenes buzz adult beverages makers.

BY ED MURRIETA

The Hemperor, New Belgium Brewing Company’s new IPA, is not the first beer brewed with hemp seeds.

Nor is it the first beer to celebrate the botanical, olfactory and gustatory similarities between hops and cannabis.

It is, however, the first hemp-infused India pale ale — an HIPA — to be distributed across the United States.

And The Hemperor, released in early April by the Colorado brewery best known for the Fat Tire brand, is certainly the first adult beverage in the legal cannabis era that’s been engineered in a laboratory to mimic the aromas and flavors of cannabis while containing no trace of the plant’s psychoactive cannabinoids.

Prohibited by the federal government from brewing with hemp flowers that would impart aromas and flavors mirrored in hops along with non-psychoactive cannabinoids like therapeutic CBD, New Belgium brews The Hemperor with hemp hearts, the meat of shelled hemp seeds, which imbue a mild, hazy nuttiness but no intoxicating effects of cannabis, hemp’s botanical sister and hops’ botanical cousin.

To mimic cannabis terpenes, New Belgium draws on other natural ingredients. In The Hemperor’s herbaceous case, natural cannabis aroma and flavor means those attributes were engineered in a laboratory to parrot pot’s polymorphic punches to noses and mouths using extracts from natural aromatics like citrus peel, grapefruit and pine sap.

The Hemperor is on tap in 49 states (Kansas bans hemp products) and will be released in six-pack bottles in late May.

I paid $4 for a 5-ounce pour of The Hemperor at Capitol Hop Shop in Sacramento on Friday, 4/20.  

The Hemperor announced itself as the bartender set the rosette glass in front of me — a waft of familiar cannabis that caught my nose and whipped my neck side to side to pick up the aroma’s source. Continue reading

Holy Cacao! Chocolate Experts Will Taste Test Cannabis Chocolate

Three noted Bay Area chocolatiers agree to assess looks, flavors and textures of leading brands.

BY ED MURRIETA

“Everyone loves chocolate and it makes people smile,” said the CEO of the 150-year-old chocolate company that bears his family’s name. “What could be better than that?”

Cannabis connoisseurs might respond, “Cannabis,” while missing the rhetorical futility of answering the chocolate CEO’s question.

From Montezuma to your grandma, chocolate tops many peoples’ list of life’s pleasures.  What could be better than chocolate? Better chocolate.

With that in mind, I asked three big names in California chocolate to eyeball and taste-test the chocolate contained in leading brands on sale in California cannabis stores. They all agreed. Taste-test pending an editor’s purchase of the story.

Never mind effects.  Experts will focus solely on brands’ chocolate quality, assessing cannabis bars on appearance, flavors and mouthfeel, caring more about cacao content than THC strength while minding the marriage of beans and terpenes in upmarket products that retail for double-digit prices.

Experts will sample only dark chocolate bars without any fruit, nut, candy or spice additives. Milk chocolate and white chocolate products were not considered.

Experts will focus on visual clues that reveal how products are manufactured, handled and stored; flavors that highlight cacao origins, roasting methods and cannabis infusion; and mouthfeel from first bite to final finish.

 

 

Reds, Whites and Green: Here’s the Buzz About Making Cannabis Wine at Home

Artisanally extract and infuse the botanical herb’s aromas, flavors and effects into wine. Plus a recipe for my mold-breaking red wine cannabis gelee.

BY ED MURRIETA

Cannabis wine is civilization’s original intoxicating collision: two great buzzes that buzz great together.

Evidence of cannabis wine — aka green wine — has been found in ancient writings and historic digs. A timeless tincture, cannabis wine’s uses have ranged from spiritual to medicinal to bacchanalian.

In modern culture — eg: California, circa 2018 — cannabis wine is a holy grail that got away.

Legalization outlawed commercially combining cannabis and alcohol, just as some boutique West Coast vintners were producing $400 bud-bouquetted bottles slowly fermented from grape juice and cannabis, artisanally extracting and infusing the botanical herb’s aromas, flavors and effects into fine wine.

Feel free to toast underground winemakers in Sonoma, Mendocino and Mesopotamia — or anywhere grapes and cannabis grow — and  invest in a home wine-making rig so you can ferment your own potent potables.

Or you can kitchen-hack cannabis wine at home using a simple, if less elegant, infusion of weed, wine and time.

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Slip These ‘Edibles’ Under Your Tongue for Fast-Acting, Great-Tasting Highs

Kin Slips are discreet, effective and flavorful cannabis-infused sublinguals

BY ED MURRIETA

There are many ways to get cannabis into your body — smoking, vaping, eating, drinking, even inserting anally — but only one method and one product have made me stick out my tongue and say, “Oh, that’s tasty-good.”

Like a Willy Wonka wallpaper fantasy, the 1-inch square of Kin Slips’ paper-thin pectin-derived material tasted like watermelon gazpacho — a sweet, cool start, followed by a lingering, licoricey finish.

Kin Slips are discrete, effective and flavorful, smartly dosed, attractively packaged and reasonably priced. The company was founded in 2016 and is based in Oakland.

Although lumped in with edibles, Kin Slips and other sublinguals are not to be eaten. Rather than chewing and digesting Kin Slips, you place them under your tongue and hold them in your mouth, letting them dissolve into your bloodstream in a fraction of time it takes your body to process cannabis-infused chocolate bars and gummy candies through your liver and stomach.

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Cannabis Buzzes Big Foodie

Bay Area food marketer has touted cannabis edibles and cannabis cuisine since 2014. This year, the Specialty Food Association listened. 

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Detail of CCD Innovation’s poster forecasting food trends for 2018.

BY ED MURRIETA

Read about it by me on the San Francisco Chronicle’s GreenState. 

Cannabis and Cars in 2018: No Smoking, No Eating, No Vaping, and Stuff Your Stash in Your Trunk

New California law outlaws consuming any form of cannabis in moving vehicles.

BY ED MURRIETA

California’s car culture and cannabis culture have been portrayed as two great things that go great together.

Fuggedaboutit, man.

Starting Monday,  drivers and passengers will be forbidden from smoking, vaping, eating, drinking or otherwise ingesting cannabis and cannabis products in moving vehicles. Gov. Jerry Brown approved the new law in September.

It is already illegal to drive while intoxicated on cannabis — even though the state has set no legal standard for impairment and no technology to measure impairment is in standard use by law enforcement.  It’s also illegal to have an open bag of cannabis in a motor vehicle.

Penalties for smoking and consuming cannabis in vehicles begin at $70 but could be as much as $10,000 if injuries or deaths are involved and insurance rates skyrocket, similar to the cost of a drunk driving ticket.

It’s already illegal to smoke cannabis in public (punishable by a $100 fine) so the famous “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” hot-box scene can’t legally be recreated today.

 

Big questions remain: How can law enforcement tell the difference between a regular cookie and a cannabis cookie? People eat and drive all the time. And how does a cop spot an e-cig vs. a vape pen?

To review:

Toldja! Specialty Food Association and Fancy Food Show Embrace Cannabis Cuisine

Pot-infused foods are No. 8 on Big Foodie’s top 10 food-trend predictions for 2018. Whole Foods edibles ahoy?

BY ED MURRIETA

On Oct. 17, I asked the Specialty Food Association if cannabis edibles will be featured at the Winter Fancy Food Show in San Francisco Jan. 21-23.

I did not receive an answer.

Until today, when I located a press release the Specialty Food Association issued Nov. 15.

Cannabis cuisine is No. 8 on the association’s Trendspotter Panel’s top 10 food-trend predictions for 2018 and will be discussed at the Winter Fancy Food Show.

“Cannabis cuisine. As more states legalize recreational marijuana, the varieties of pot-enhanced food and beverage will increase. Look out for continued interest and acceptance in a host of snacks, treats, and beverages with a little something extra.*”

“*The Specialty Food Association recognizes that Federal law prohibits the possession, sale or distribution of marijuana, but its sale and use is declared legal under some state laws. In recognizing cannabis as a food trend, the SFA in no way endorses or encourages activities which are in violation of state or Federal law.”

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How to Make Any Cookbook a Cannabis Cookbook

Open mainstream cookbook. Pick a recipe. Add cannabis. 


BY ED MURRIETA

It happens most holiday gift-giving seasons: You give your mother your wish list. Instead of the Schwinn you want, she gives you a Huffy.

What do you do if you want a cannabis cookbook and someone gives you a regular cookbook?

Turn lemons into lemonade and turn almost any sober cookbook into a canna-cookbook.

Here are five new and popular mainstream cookbooks: “Cherry Bombe: The Cookbook, ” “Smitten Kitchen Every Day, “Modernist Bread,” “Dinner in an Instant” and “BraveTart.”

Despite many of their stoner-friendly recipes — Pink Spaghetti and brownies, for Shiva’s sake — none of the hot-selling titles have anything to do with pot.

Until now.
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The Regs: Edibles’ Size and Potency Shrink

What’s happening with high-potency edibles?
Are they shoving micro-dosing down our throats? 

638253596BY ED MURRIETA

Shrinkage of edibles’ potency and portion size top The Regs:.

What’s happening with high-potency edibles?

— Sammy Quintana, Capitola

Are they shoving micro-dosing down our throats? 

— Barb Tandy, Berkeley

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Mainstream Coffee Brand Jolts Cannabis Marketing

Oakland edibles startup and San Francisco micro-roaster brew cannabis industry’s first Intel Inside moment.

Read about it by me in the San Francisco Chronicle. 

BY ED MURRIETA

To aficionados who enjoy a caffeine buzz with their marijuana buzz, coffee and cannabis go together like cream and sugar and Cheech and Chong rolled into one energy-inducing, mind-altering jolt.

After decades of counterculture popularity, the classic java-and-a-joint combo, aka the Hippie Highball, has been re-booted in the modern age of legal weed.

Cannabis-infused single-brew coffee pods entered California’s medical cannabis edibles marketplace in 2015 but require K-Cup-style brewing machines and remain a novelty.

The more accessible 2017 pairing combines three red-hot trends — cold-brewed coffee, artisan cannabis concentrate and low-dose edibles — into a singularly robust concept that boasts the added kick of being the first example of a mainstream company lending its brand to a cannabis product.

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